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Who Led Zeppelin's John Bonham Considered a True Pioneer Among Rock Drummers

Start a debate about the “Best Rock Drummers Ever” and you’re going to have conversations about a few of the music’s greatest personalities. That’s because you can’t tackle the subject without bringing up Keith Moon (1946-1978) of The Who and John Bonham (1948-80) of Led Zeppelin.

In their day, “Bonzo” and “Moon the Loon” would light up arenas with their drumming and then cap off the night by terrorizing the occupants of the hotels where they were staying. And then they’d do the same the next night (and countless more times on that tour).

But the work they left behind on Who and Zeppelin records guarantees them a spot on the Mount Rushmore of drummers. And while you’re carving that mountain you’ll need a sketch of Ginger Baker (1939-2019), the fiery drummer of Cream and various bands he led under his own name.

For a drummer like Bonham, who came of age in the early ’60s, Baker was the one to watch (and learn from). “I don’t think anyone can ever put Ginger Baker down,” Bonham said in an interview published in Led Zeppelin in Their Own Words. He really admired the way Baker took a lead role in rock bands.

John Bonham said Ginger Baker was the 1st rock drummer to play a starring role

RELATED: ‘When the Levee Breaks’: How Jimmy Page Recorded John Bonham’s Epic Drum Part

When you think of drummers who elevated the kit’s status and became stars in bands (and even bandleaders), Gene Krupa is often the consensus pick. Krupa’s showmanship and leading-from-the-kit mentality inspired generations of drummers (Moon included).

But in terms of rock drummers Bonham thought Baker was the equivalent. “People hadn’t taken much notice of drums before Krupa,” Bonham said in In Their Own Words. “And Ginger Baker was responsible for the same thing in rock.” To Bonham, it was about Baker’s overall approach.

“[Baker] was the first to come out with this ‘new’ attitude — that a drummer could be a forward musician in a rock band, and not something that was stuck in the background and forgotten about,” Bonham said. And he admired the way Baker showcased his unique influences.

“I think Baker was really more into jazz than rock,” Bonham said. “He plays with a jazz influence. He’s always doing things in 5/4 and 3/4 tempos. […] Ginger’s thing as a drummer is that he was always himself.”

Bonham’s favorite Baker period came before the Cream days

Though Baker had played in bands prior to Cream, his run with Eric Clapton and Jack Bruce in their power trio from 1966-68 made him world-famous. And tracks such as “Toad,” which featured an extended drum solo, eliminated any doubts about Baker’s position in the band. (Bonham made a similar statement with “Moby Dick” on Led Zeppelin II.)

After Cream, Baker played with Blind Faith (another band featuring Clapton) and then formed Ginger Baker’s Air Force. In the ’70s, he set up a recording studio in Nigeria and collaborated with Afrobeat pioneer Fela Kuti. Clearly, Baker did not like sitting still for long.

But of all those collaborations Bonham preferred his early work. “I thought he was fantastic with the Graham Bond Organisation [1963-66],” Bonham said. “It’s a pity American audiences didn’t see that band because it really was a fantastic group — Ginger Baker, Jack Bruce, and Graham Bond.”

RELATED: The 2 Rock Drummers Paul McCartney Ranked Among the Best Next to Ringo

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How Led Zeppelin's 'Dazed and Confused' Was Different From the Yardbirds Version

It was a long journey from the earliest version of “Dazed and Confused” to the marathon — at times, over 30-minute — performances Led Zeppelin would deliver in the band’s prime. And it all started with Jake Holmes, a songwriter and performer Jimmy Page saw open for The Yardbirds in 1967.

At the time, Page was working as the Yardbirds’ lead guitarist and songwriter following the departure of Jeff Beck. As for Holmes, who later got a songwriting credit after suing Led Zeppelin, he’d already created the descending riff and concept of the track when Page saw it with his band.

It impressed Page enough that he embellished the song with his fellow Yardbirds, working out a new arrangement and adding new lyrics. And if you catch recordings of the band in the Page era you’ll hear them perform it.

Of course, in the Led Zeppelin era, “Dazed and Confused” became one of the band’s signature songs during its knockout live performances. By that point, the track had evolved a long way from Holmes’ original concept.

The Yardbirds’ ‘Dazed and Confused’ was a strong first crack by Jimmy Page

RELATED: The ‘Led Zeppelin III’ Track Jimmy Page Brought From His Yardbirds Days

After the departure of Beck, Page dove into his work with The Yardbirds. In the previous years, he’d worked as an ace session guitarist in London and decided he was ready to get going with his own band. And he had plenty to work with in the former group of both Beck and Eric Clapton.

In the Page era, Keith Relf still handled vocals, while drummer Jim McCarty and bassist Chris Dreja (previously the rhythm guitarist) rounded out the band. Between the four of them, they came up with an impressive re-imagining of “Dazed and Confused.”

Zeppelin fans will have no trouble recognizing the opening bars. Dreja’s bass line sounds close to what John Paul Jones would later play, while Page does his psychedelic accents on guitar. However, The Yardbirds version features a lot of heavy drums at the start.

When Relf’s vocals begin, Zep fans will notice another key difference. In his performance, he handles the lyrics in almost spoken-word style. But from there the song sounds familiar, instrumentally. There’s the moody middle section with Page bowing his guitar; the call-and-response of bass and guitar; and a heavy solo before a final run through a verse.

The Led Zeppelin version is far more dramatic — and a showcase for Robert Plant

After forming Zeppelin, Page took production into his own hands. And his recording of “Dazed and Confused” (with engineer Glyn Johns) is a masterpiece. Page wanted each instrument loud and clear in the mix, and he got that for Jones’ haunting opening.

At least in the opening bars, John Bonham plays quietly, taking a back seat in the mix. That’s a big change from The Yardbirds’ version. But when Robert Plant begins his vocals this “Dazed and Confused” hits another level. (Page rewrote the lyrics to further distance the song from Holmes’ version.)

All four members of Led Zeppelin have spoken of the impact they felt the first time they played together — and you get a sense of what they meant with this recording. In the hands of a Hall of Fame band like The Yardbirds, “Dazed and Confused” was good; in Zeppelin’s hands it became an explosion.

Everything — starting with Plant’s attack and continuing with the song’s epic scale — comes off better with Page and Zeppelin at work. And as solos go Page seemed determined to tear through strings and blow out speakers with his guitar work here. All in all, a good song became great in Zep’s hands.

RELATED: Jimmy Page Didn’t Sleep for 5 Days During Led Zeppelin’s ‘Song Remains the Same’ Concerts

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Patrice Evra led the way in DITCHING Black Lives Matter badge

Sky Sports pundit Patrice Evra led the way in DITCHING Black Lives Matter badge just before last night’s show and Jamie Redknapp and host Kelly Cates followed his lead as Premier League distances itself following group’s extreme statements

  • Redknapp, Evra, Cates and commentator Gary Neville were all not wearing badges on Sky Sports last night
  • Premier League distanced itself from movement after it criticised Israel and called for police to be defunded
  • But players in yesterday’s match still ‘took the knee’ before kick-off and had ‘Black Lives Matter’ on sleeves
  • However black Sky Sports News presenter Mike Wedderburnwas still wearing a BLM badge on today’s show

Sky Sports allowed their pundits to decide whether to wear Black Lives Matter badges before going on air last night – with Patrice Evra ditching his first, before Jamie Redknapp followed suit, MailOnline can reveal today.

Redknapp and Evra along with host Kelly Cates and commentator Gary Neville were not wearing the badges during Sky’s coverage of Brighton and Hove Albion v Manchester United in the Premier League last night.

It came after the Premier League distanced itself from the movement, but players in yesterday’s match still ‘took the knee’ before kick-off and had ‘Black Lives Matter’ on their sleeves after George Floyd’s death in the US in May.

Since the league resumed on June 17, Sky Sports presenters have worn the badges with the campaign phrase after all 20 clubs agreed to emblazon ‘Black Lives Matter’ on their shirts for all matches following the Covid-19 break.

Players and officials have also ‘taken the knee’ before matches, a symbol adopted by US athletes to protest police brutality and racism in 2016 and now used in BLM protests across the world. However, concerns have been raised after a series of tweets by BLM which criticised Israel and called on the British government to ‘defund the police’. 

Meanwhile Sky Sports News presenter Mike Wedderburn – who last week issued a powerful speech after a ‘White Lives Matter Burnley’ banner was flown over a match – was still wearing a BLM badge on this morning’s show.  And Sky Sports appeared to still be backing the movement, carrying the hashtag #BlackLivesMatter before ad breaks.

The Premier League said yesterday it recognised ‘the importance of the message that black lives matter’ – without referring to the organisation’s name in upper case – but made clear that it ‘does not endorse any political organisation or movement, nor support any group that calls for violence or condones illegal activity.’

BT Sport, which is showing Arsenal v Norwich City tonight, will also let pundits decide whether to wear the badge. And MailOnline can also reveal the issue has been discussed by several players, with a group of top-flight captains considering whether to make a public statement on the matter.

While the players remain united in campaigning for equality and maintaining such symbolic gestures for the rest of the season, some are concerned about being associated with the political activism of BLM. 

On Sunday, BLM UK issued a barrage of tweets over Israel’s proposed annexation of the West Bank and claimed that ‘mainstream British politics is gagged of the right to critique Zionism.’ 

The following day Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer, who has ‘taken the knee’ alongside parliamentary colleagues, called it a ‘shame’ that the sentiment behind the BLM protests was getting ‘tangled up with these organisational issues’ and said calls to defund the police were ‘nonsense.’

BLM UK responded by tweeting that ‘as a public prosecutor, Sir Keir Starmer was a cop in an expensive suit.’

Sky Sports’ ditching of the BLM badges during yesterday’s coverage at the Amex Stadium comes after another pundit, Matt Le Tissier, said he only wore the badge after being asked to do so by bosses at the broadcaster. 

Upon seeing Sky’s top pundits had stopped wearing BLM badges on air, fans were quick to share their thoughts on Twitter, with one saying: ‘If only they’d done a little research like us peasants did before jumping in with both feet.’

Another wrote: ‘Maybe research an organisation next time blokes before you support their “cause”‘, while someone else posted: ‘Slowly people are realising BLM is an anti-Semitic, anarchistic anti white, anti law and order movement, and regretting their foolish support’.


Pundits Jamie Redknapp (left, yesterday) and Patrice Evra were not wearing Black Lives Matter badges when appearing on last night’s show on Sky Sports. But ten days ago Redknapp did wear the BLM pin on his suit (right)

Redknapp (left) and Evra (right) were discussing the Premier League match on Sky Sports last night with host Kelly Cates (centre) as the row over the Black Lives Matter’s anti-police and anti-capitalist aims rumbled on

Former Manchester United full back Patrice Evra, who appeared on last night’s show (pictured), did not wear a BLM badge despite being a vocal campaigner against racism and being a victim of it himself

Sky Sports News presenter Mike Wedderburn – who last week issued a powerful speech after a ‘White Lives Matter Burnley’ banner was flown over a match – was still wearing a BLM badge on this morning’s programme (above)

Sky Sports News appeared to still be backing the movement, carrying the hashtag #BlackLivesMatter before ad breaks today

Le Tissier, 51, criticised the group’s ‘far-left ideology’ and said he ‘could not support’ the cause’s anti-police and anti-capitalist aims. 

He had, along with fellow Sky pundit Jamie Carragher appeared on air wearing a BLM badge but said he only did so after being asked to. Sky Sports said the issue of wearing the BLM badge was a matter of individual choice.  

Patrice Evra said in a video just over a month ago (on June 8) that his ‘heart is burning’ as he spoke out against racism following the murder of George Floyd in the United States

The players’ call to endorse the sentiment behind the Black Lives Matter movement — the need for action to ensure greater equality and an expression of solidarity with those who have suffered persecution because of their race — was instrumental in persuading the Premier League to make the campaign such a visible part of Project Restart.

Every game since the resumption has been prefaced by players and match officials taking a knee in tribute to George Floyd, while the partner of Watford captain Troy Deeney designed a BLM logo which features on the shirts of all 20 Premier League clubs. 

In yesterday’s statement, the Premier League said it stands alongside clubs and footballing bodies in supporting people who have ‘come together in recent weeks to reject racism and to show support for the message that black lives matter.’

However, it then went on: ‘We do not endorse any political organisation or movement, nor support any group that calls for violence or condones illegal activity.

‘We are aware of the risk posed by groups that seek to hijack popular causes and campaigns to promote their own political views. 

‘These actions are entirely unwelcome and are rejected by the Premier League and all other professional football bodies, and they underline the importance of our sport coming together to declare a very clear position against prejudice.’ 

The Premier League has distanced itself from Black Lives Matter and said it ‘does not endorse’ the group after pundit Matt Le Tissier said he only wore their badge (circled) on TV after being asked to by Sky Sports bosses

The body said in a statement that while there is ‘no room for racism in football’, it does not support any ‘political organisation or movement’. Pictured: Former Liverpool player Jamie Carragher wearing a BLM badge while working for Sky on June 21

The dramatic about-turn came even though dozens of Premier League footballers have taken the knee – the symbol of the BLM movement – since the restart of the competition earlier this month . Watford’s Troy Deeney is pictured doing so on June 20

On Sunday, Black Lives Matter UK issued a barrage of tweets over Israel’s proposed annexation of the West Bank and claimed that ‘mainstream British politics is gagged of the right to critique Zionism’

Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer, who has ‘taken the knee’ alongside parliamentary colleagues, called it a ‘shame’ that the sentiment behind the BLM protests was getting ‘tangled up with these organisational issues’ and said calls to defund the police were ‘nonsense’

The message came after the UK arm of Black Lives Matter said it wants to defund the police completely and abolish capitalism and has pledged support for Palestine amid Israel’s plans to annex the West Bank.  

The Premier League’s statement in full

The Premier League stands alongside players, clubs, The FA, EFL, PFA, LMA, PGMOL and all those who have come together in recent weeks to reject racism and to show support for the message that black lives matter. These three words have become an expression of unity for people from all communities who believe it is unacceptable to treat black people differently to anyone else.

In an unprecedented move, Premier League players from all 20 clubs united in solidarity with this message and the Premier League supported their request to replace their names on the back of playing shirts with ‘Black Lives Matter’.

The Premier League offered this backing as we wholly agree with the players’ single objective of eradicating racial prejudice wherever it exists. And we are unequivocal in the belief that there is no room for racism in our competition, football as a whole, or the wider community. Together, all professional football bodies and the players and managers recognise the importance of the message that black lives matter. However, we do not endorse any political organisation or movement, nor support any group that calls for violence or condones illegal activity.

We are aware of the risk posed by groups that seek to hijack popular causes and campaigns to promote their own political views. These actions are entirely unwelcome and are rejected by the Premier League and all other professional football bodies, and they underline the importance of our sport coming together to declare a very clear position against prejudice. We want our message to be a positive one that recognises football has the power to bring people together.

As the players have made clear, we will all continue to work to promote equality of opportunity – regardless of colour or creed – and celebrate the advantages of diversity wherever we can.

The Premier League believes there is no room for racism or any form of discrimination, anywhere #NoRoomforRacism.

The group’s other aims prompted Le Tissier to tell MailOnline yesterday of his concerns. 

His words followed black footballer Karl Henry, formerly of Wolverhampton Wanderers and Queens Park Rangers, who branded the group ‘divisive’.   

Le Tissier said bosses at Sky had asked him and other pundits to wear the logo for their appearances and he agreed, but pointed out he supported ‘the cause, not the organisation’. 

Speaking outside his home near Southampton, he said: ‘I just don’t agree with some of the points of that movement – specifically the defunding of the police and the anti capitalist points are things I do not agree with.

‘They are the two main points for me. I am quite happy for them to have their point of view, but that is mine and that is where I sit. I think a lot of people in the country would agree with me.

‘I will still wear the badge because I do of course believe black lives matter. 

‘It’s a simple thing, I agree with the cause but there are parts of the organisation that I just cannot support.’

When asked whether pundits on Sky Sports had been told to wear the badge, Le Tissier laughed and said: ‘We were asked to wear it.’ 

He and Henry had been the only high-profile voices in football so far to raise concerns about the UK arm, which has protested over the killing of George Floyd by a white policeman in the US.

Until them the sport had completely embraced the movement, with players taking the knee before Premier League and Championship matches kicked off.

But the past few days has seen the group embroiled in an anti-Semitism row and criticism of its ‘defund the police’ agenda. 

Presenters and guests on Sky Sports have worn BLM badges when appearing on programmes, but now Le Tissier says he has held talks with his bosses about this.

Meanwhile Henry has called for a ‘new inclusive and politically-neutral anti-racism movement’ after savaging the UK group online.

In response, the channel said no-one was obliged to wear the logo, with a source adding it supported the group simply for its anti-racism stance.

The Southampton legend and former England international replied to a tweet accusing him of ‘promoting a far-left ideology’ and said he had spoken with Sky Sports chiefs about the matter.  

Le Tissier is one of football’s most popular pundits after a glittering career at Southampton and was voted the greatest Premier League player of all time in a Eurosport poll. 

June 17: Sky Sports presenter Jamie Carragher (left) wears a BLM badge during at the Etihad Stadium in Manchester

June 20: Former England defender Rio Ferdinand wears a BLM and NHS badge during BT Sport Premier League coverage

June 25: Micah Richards, Gabby Logan and Phil Neville were all not wearing BLM badges on the BBC’s Match of the Day

June 28: (From left) Matt Murray, presenter David Jones and Chris Iwelumo were all wearing the badges on Sky Sports

June 28: Micah Richards, Alan Shearer and Gary Lineker don’t wear badges in the BBC gantry at St James’ Park in Newcastle

June 28: Dion Dublin, Gabby Logan and Alex Scott appear without wearing BLM badges on Match of the Day’s highlights show

He began the debate by urging his followers to remove him on Twitter if they were from the ‘far right or far left’. 

Black Lives Matter: Group wants to abolish the police, smash capitalism and close all prisons

Black Lives Matter UK is the semi-official British offshoot of its American counterpart and has been the face of the UK’s protests over George Floyd’s death and racial equailty.

But while hundreds of thousands of people have donated millions to their cause, many will be unaware on many of the group’s more extreme aims.

The UK branch, just like the American arm of the movement, has a number of far-Left aims listed on its  wesbite.

They include the Marxist ‘commitment to dismantle capitalism’.

Elsewhere the group says it wants to use money it has raised to develop and deliver strategies ‘for the abolition of the police’.

The official Twitter account of the Black Lives Matter (BLM) UK movement has also been caught up in an antisemitism row.

It tweeted in support of Palestine over plans by Israel to annex its West Bank settlements.

The verified account claimed mainstream British politics were being ‘gagged of the right to critique Zionism,’ before Tweeting that the movement ‘loudly and clearly stands beside our Palestinian comrades’ and adding in block capitals ‘FREE PALESTINE’.

It sparked anger among the Jewish community, with some describing the idea of politicians being ‘gagged’ over their criticism of Zionism as being an ‘antisemitic trope’.

 The Campaign Against Antisemitism (CAA) said: ‘BLM should aspire to be a movement against racism that unifies people and achieves lasting change, not a movement that spreads hatred and achieves lasting division.

‘You cannot fight prejudice with prejudice.’ 

The group has been active online since mid-2016.

In December that year it endorsed the complete closure of all Britain’s prisons and detention centres, saying they were ‘inhumane, overcrowded and unsafe’.

The group has also expressed its opposition on Twitter to government initiatives including reform of the benefits system via the introduction of Universal Credit and the licensing of fracking. 

It has attacked everyone from Oxfam (‘big charities are nothing more than colonisers for the 21st century’) to Sir David Attenborough.

The group accused an episode of his 2018 TV series Dynasties, on chimpanzees, of being racist because the BBC naturalist complained that habitat destruction due to overpopulation was threatening the species with extinction.

‘Human activities can obviously compete with wildlife,’ the anomymous BLM Tweeter opined. ‘But ‘too many people’ always has a silent ‘black’.’

‘Morning peeps, polite request, if you’re far right or far left do me and yourselves a favour and unfollow me, it’ll be good for yours and our mental health as I couldn’t give 2 hoots how many followers I have I won’t be offended.’ 

One Twitter user replied: ‘If you are central Matt why wear a badge promoting a far left ideology?’ 

The 51-year-old wrote back: ‘That’s a good point and one which I’ve made to my boss already.’ 

Another said: ‘Maybe you should review your BLM badge wearing’, to which he responded: ‘I am reviewing’.

There has been plenty of reaction and debate following Le Tissier’s tweet, with another user saying he ‘hated this badging of the left and right’. 

And one replied telling him ‘that BLM badge is a bit dodgy’.

There has been plenty of reaction and debate following Le Tissier’s tweet, with another user saying he ‘hated this badging of the left and right’. 

And one replied telling him ‘that BLM badge is a bit dodgy’.

Former Wolves, Stoke City, QPR, Bolton and Bradford City professional footballer Karl Henry also raised concerns about the aims of BLM UK. 

He tweeted yesterday: ‘I think the majority of the UK have now had enough of that organisation.       

‘A new inclusive and politically-neutral anti-racism movement to follow and get behind is much needed. Black people’s lives matter!

‘The divisive #BlackLivesMatter organisation, however, DOES NOT.’

Black Lives Matter encourage the slogan #DefundThePolice amid outcry over alleged violence by police towards black people, saying they ‘call for an end to the systemic racism that allows this culture of corruption to go unchecked and our lives to be taken’.

In further remarks he took aim at some of the UK group’s far-left policies.   

He added: ‘Let’s just look at Capitalism, which #BlackLivesMatterUK want to abolish. 

‘It does NOT favour white people. It is not the enemy of the black community. 

‘Capitalism allows free enterprise and entrepreneurialism. If other communities can flourish under capitalism, so can we!’ 

Speaking about their views on the police on the Black Lives Matter website, the movement says Floyd’s death was a ‘breaking point’ and ‘a reminder that, for black people, law enforcement doesn’t protect or save our lives. They often threaten and take them’.

They have called for ‘a national defunding of police’, asking for ‘investment in our communities and the resources to ensure Black people not only survive, but thrive’.

But there is a growing chorus of voices who want to know exactly who is behind the group.

Last week they posted a statement on various social media feeds, promising soon to ‘create a website’ that would ‘ease any confusion around which of the many Black Lives Matter organisations and platforms that have emerged is actually us’.

Former footballer Karl Henry spoke out against Black Lives Matter UK over their anti-capitalism and stance on trying to abolish the police (pictured here playing for Bolton in 2018)

 

Le Tissier appeared to echo tweets by Henry who said he thought the public had tired of the Black Lives Matter UK group

Fans were quick to take to Twitter to give their thoughts on pundits’ decision to snub BLM UK

 

 

Twitter users urged Sky pundits to ‘research an organisation before supporting their cause’

The statement also promised its spending ‘will be made public in the spirit of transparency and accountability in due course’. As to who is behind the organisation, it claimed its leaders were busy dealing with ’emergency legal matters’ and ‘the hostility of far-Right groups’ which represent ‘a genuine threat to our safety’.

Yesterday it seemed to be trying to row back on its police money remarks, tweeting a post at odds with its own published aims.

It said: ‘When we say ‘Defund the police’ we mean invest in programmes that actually keep us safe like youth services, mental health and social care, education, jobs and housing. Key services to support the most vulnerable before they come into contact with the criminal justice system.’

A Sky Sports said none of the presenters were obliged to wear the badges. One source familiar with the situation added: ‘It is the individual’s choice whether they wear the badges or not.

‘The channel’s support for Black Lives Matter is for the moral cause of the campaign for racial justice, rather than for any political organisation.’ 

Premier League players fearful of links to Black Lives Matter activists as captains consider making a public statement distancing themselves from the UK wing

ByMatt Hughes For The Daily Mail

Premier League players want to distance themselves from the official UK wing of the Black Lives Matter organisation amid concerns over its ideology and political ambitions.

Sportsmail can reveal that the issue has been discussed by several players, with the group of top-flight captains considering whether to make a public statement on the matter.

The players’ call to endorse the sentiment behind the Black Lives Matter movement — the need for action to ensure greater equality and an expression of solidarity with those who have suffered persecution because of their race — was instrumental in persuading the Premier League to make the campaign such a visible part of Project Restart.

Players want to distance themselves from the official Black Lives Matter organisation

Premier League stars donned ‘Black Lives Matter’ playing shirts when the top-flight resumed

Every game since the resumption has been prefaced by players and match officials taking a knee in tribute to George Floyd, while the partner of Watford captain Troy Deeney designed a BLM logo which features on the shirts of all 20 Premier League clubs.

While the players remain united in campaigning for equality and committed to maintaining such symbolic gestures for the remainder of the season, some are concerned about being associated with the political activism of Black Lives Matter UK. In the last few days, the official BLM UK Twitter account has caused controversy by calling for the overthrow of capitalism, reductions in police funding and an end to free trade with Israel.

Former Wolves midfielder Karl Henry criticised BLM UK on social media on Tuesday as a divisive organisation, while Sky Sports pundit Matt Le Tissier said he would review his decision to wear a BLM badge in comments that have sparked a debate among players.

Karl Henry criticised BLM UK on social media on Tuesday – calling them a divisive organisation

‘I think the majority of the UK have now had enough of that organisation,’ wrote Henry on Twitter. ‘A new inclusive and politically neutral anti-racism movement to follow and get behind is much needed. Black people’s lives matter! The divisive #BlackLivesMatter organisation, however, DOES NOT.’

The Premier League have not provided any funding to BLM UK and chief executive Richard Masters told MPs on Tuesday that his organisation remain apolitical.

Appearing before a select committee of the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, Masters attempted to draw a distinction between moral and political causes, although this position was criticised by Sunderland MP Julie Elliott, who accused him of ‘opening a can of worms’.

The Premier League and the FA prohibit participants in the game from making political statements, with Manchester City manager Pep Guardiola fined two years ago by the latter for wearing a ribbon in support of Catalan independence.

Richard Masters told MPs on Tuesday that the Premier League remain apolitical

‘I don’t think it sets any particular precedent,’ Masters insisted. ‘I think it’s perfectly possible to support Black Lives Matter without being seen to be supporting any political organisation.

‘We’re happy to support the players. We think it’s the right moment to do it and for the first time I feel that players, managers, Premier League and clubs are on the same page on the issue of discrimination. That feels like a positive step.

‘We’re drawing a clear distinction between a moral cause and a political movement.

‘While there may be some difficulty sometimes in dividing the two, our position is clear. Politics no, moral causes yes — when agreed. We’re living in special times at the moment.’

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The 'Led Zeppelin III' Track Jimmy Page Brought From His Yardbirds Days

When the four members of Led Zeppelin played their first shows together in 1968, they went by the name “The New Yardbirds.” And while that name wouldn’t last beyond a few concert dates it was an accurate description of the assembled musicians.

After The Yardbirds fell apart in early ’68, guitarist Jimmy Page was left holding the pieces. It had been whirlwind of a ride for Page since he joined the group as the Yardbirds’ bassist in ’66. Following the departure of Jeff Beck that year, he began experimenting as the group’s lead guitarist.

If you listen to the Yardbirds material from that period, you’ll notice riffs and songs that turned up on Zeppelin’s explosive 1969 debut. The list includes parts of “How Many More Times” and nearly all of “Dazed and Confused.”

But The Yardbirds didn’t die with the first Zep record. On the second side of Led Zeppelin III (1970), Page revived a Yardbirds song he’d written and recorded with the band in ’68. (They never released it.) The track was titled “Knowing That I’m Losing You” and became reborn as “Tangerine.”

Jimmy Page revived The Yardbirds’ ‘Knowing That I’m Losing You’

RELATED: Why Led Zeppelin’s ‘All My Love’ Didn’t Sit Right With Jimmy Page

At the end of the Yardbirds’ run, the band had hit-maker Mickie Most as its producer, and everyone can agree now that it wasn’t a good fit. After a number of unsuccessful sessions, Most was out and Peter Grant stepped in, allowing Page to regroup and form Led Zeppelin.

However, before that final nail in the coffin, The Yardbirds did record live numbers and some demo tracks during one last American tour. And on the release Yardbirds ’68 (2017) Zeppelin fans can’t ignore the track “Knowing That I’m Losing You.”

From Page’s gorgeous 12-string intro to the various sections of the song, it’s a clear first run at “Tangerine” from III. But the song appears on Yardbirds ’68 as an instrumental. According to some of Page’s old bandmates, singer Keith Relf had written lyrics for the track.

No vocal appears on the Yardbirds release, so we can’t say how close the two versions are. Either way, we know how the song ended up on Zep’s third album with Page as the sole songwriter.

Page reworked the song as ‘Tangerine’ for ‘Led Zeppelin III’

While taking a break in remote Bron-Yr-Aur (Wales), Page and Robert Plant wrote a few songs on acoustic guitars that made their way onto the band’s third album. And the memorable “That’s the Way” was one of them.

When putting the album together, Page clearly wanted to revise his late draft that was “Knowing That I’m Losing You” for the new record. And it became “Tangerine” after Page thought of some new lyrics. The song fit in perfectly on side 2 of Led Zeppelin III.

The story didn’t exactly end there. At some point, Relf’s sister claimed that her brother deserved some type of credit for his work on the first version of “Tangerine.” And the Yardbirds ’68 release presumably settled the matter.

Musically speaking, there was never any question about the songwriter. In the end, “Tangerine” went down as a rare Led Zeppelin track credited only to Page. After writing lyrics (in addition to producing, arranging, playing guitar, etc.) in the early years, Page handed off that job to Plant for good.

RELATED: Why Robert Plant Knew Negative Reviews of ‘Led Zeppelin III’ Didn’t Matter

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BLM protests have not led to a spike in coronavirus cases: study

Black Lives Matter protests haven’t seen coronavirus cases surge in cities since the massive demonstrations began, a study says.

The new research, which was published by the National Bureau of Economic Research, found no evidence that coronavirus cases jumped in 315 cities in the weeks following the first protests.

Researchers determined that protests may have been offset by an increase in social distancing among those who decided not to march.

Using cellphone data, the study determined that more people opted to stay home “perhaps due to fear of violence from police clashes or general unrest.”

“While it is almost certain that the protests caused a decrease in social distancing behavior among protest attendees, we demonstrate that effect of the protests on the social distancing behavior of the entire population residing in counties with large urban protests was positive,” the report reads.

Researchers said they observed no jump in cases in the more than three weeks after the first protests, possibly due to a “net effect.”

“While it is possible that the protests caused an increase in the spread of COVID-19 among those who attended the protests, we demonstrate that the protests had little effect on the spread of COVID-19 for the entire population of the counties with protests during the more than three weeks following protest onset,” researchers said.

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Artist who designed Led Zeppelin's debut album sells original tracing

Rock and rollin’ in it! Artist who designed Led Zeppelin’s iconic debut album cover for £60 sells his original tracing for £260,000

  • George Hardie, 76, has sold the original tracing of Led Zeppelin’s debut album 
  • The original tracing for the cover has sold for £260,500 at a sale at Christie’s
  • Produced his version of image of the Hindenburg Zeppelin airship on fire in 1937 

The artist who designed the iconic cover for Led Zeppelin’s debut album has sold the original tracing of the famous image for £260,000. 

Revered designer George Hardie, 76, was paid just £60 to produce his version of photographer Sam Shere’s image of the Hindenburg Zeppelin airship on fire in 1937 for the cover of Led Zeppelin’s self-titled 1969 album.

Now, more than 50 years later, the original stipple tracing which went on to become one of the famous pieces of art work in rock and roll history, has sold for £260,500 at a sale at Christie’s.

Mr Hardie, who marked tracing paper with small black dots to create an image similar to a low-resolution newsprint photo, had stored the single sheet of tracing paper in a drawer but seemingly forgot about it for decades.

The original tracing for Led Zeppelin’s very first album cover in 1969 has sold for £260,500 at a sale at Christie’s

The iconic rock band was originally going to be called The New Yardbirds until the The Who’s drummer Keith Moon remarked that the idea would go down like a ‘lead balloon’. Pictured left to right: Robert Plant, Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones  and John Bonham

However he recently unearthed it in the bottom of a plan chest in his studio alongside a prescient note written many years ago.

Mr Hardie, who retired as a lecturer in illustration at the University of Brighton in 2014, said: ‘It was unsullied, in a clean folder on which one of my partners had written years ago, ”G’s pension fund”.’ 

The designer offered it for sale at auction with Christies who gave it a pre-sale estimate of £25,000.

But the album and its art work is held in such high regard by music memorabilia collectors that interest and bidding in it took off and eventually sold for a total price of £260,500 – more than ten times the estimate.

Mr Hardie was an undergraduate at the Royal College of Art when his friend, photographer Stephen Goldblatt, recommended him to Led Zeppelin in 1969.

Revered artist George Hardie (pictured), who retired as a lecturer in illustration at the University of Brighton in 2014, was originally paid £60 for his design

After rejecting his initial ideas, guitarist Jimmy Page suggested that Mr Hardie adapt the photo of the Hindenburg disaster.

Mr Hardie added: ‘I think the drawing made a good and memorable cover, but this was more to do with the photograph and Jimmy Page’s choice of it than with my skill as a dotter.’ 

The artist, who graduated in 1970, went on to design album cover for Pink Floyd’s The Dark Side of the Moon

The iconic rock band, which was set up by guitarist Jimmy Page in 1968, was originally going to be called The New Yardbirds until the The Who’s drummer Keith Moon remarked that the idea would go down like a ‘lead balloon’. 

The term stuck with Page who changed the word ‘balloon’ for ‘zeppelin’ when he, Robert Plant, John Paul Jones and John Bonham formed Led Zeppelin. 

Their debut record is said to have redefined the music industry and the art work has been reproduced countless times on posters, T-shirts and other items of Led Zeppelin merchandise. 

A spokesman for Christies said: ‘We are thrilled with the result of the sale and the vendor is also very pleased.

‘From what we understand, the tracing had been in his (George Hardie) files for some time had not been located until recently. 

Mr Hardie marked tracing paper with small black dots to create the iconic cover for the band. Pictured: George Hardie’s signature on the cover

The British rock band Led Zeppelin pose for a photograph in front of their private airliner The Starship in 1973

‘The market for important pop culture continues to be extremely robust and iconic images such as this one resonate very strongly with collectors in that area.

‘Very often the most seemingly ephemeral things are the objects that collectors value later on.

‘Consider for example how disposable comic books, rare early issues are valued so highly now.

‘For Hardie, this was a simple tracing of a photograph, and little more than that, in a strictly artistic sense.

‘But the image took on a life of its own, and is now recognised as one of the most iconic images in the history of rock and roll.’

George Hardie and Led Zeppelin’s iconic debut album

The band’s debut album (pictured is the album cover) was released in 1969 by Atlantic Records and contained a mix of original pieces fused with blues and folk songs

Led Zeppelin were originally going to be called The New Yardbirds until guitarist Jimmy Page, who set up the band in 1968, was told by The Who’s drummer Keith Moon that the name would go down like a ‘lead balloon’. 

In 1969, while he was just an art student at the Royal College of Art, George Hardie met with the manager of the new rock band Peter Grant and presented ideas for the group’s new cover.

However the ideas were rejected by the band’s guitarist Jimmy Page who instead wanted an image inspired by the Hindenburg Zeppelin exploding into flames in 1937 and taken by the photographer Sam Shere. 

Mr Hardie then set about recreating the image of the Zeppelin using the finest Rapidograph and a sheet of tracing paper to give it the appearance of a low-resolution newspaper photo. 

He was paid just £60 for the artwork which was later reproduced countless times on posters, T-shirts and other items of Led Zeppelin merchandise.

The artist, who graduated in 1970, went on to design album cover for Pink Floyd’s The Dark Side of the Moon.

The first album was released in January 1969 in the U.S and in March in the UK by Atlantic Records. 

It contained a mix of original pieces the band had created in their first rehearsals and was fused with blues and folk songs.

Page previously reported that the album took 36 hours to make in the studio. 

The band’s debut album included the hits Good Times Bad Times, Baby I’m Gonna Leave You, Dazed And Confused and You Shook Me.

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